Rental Market

What have been the top performing property types of the past decade?

What have been the top performing property types of the past decade?

Fresh research from Proportunity reveals how different property types performed over the past decade, based on price growth.

The data, collected across England and Wales, shows that terraced houses have been the best performing housing type in the past 10 years, with terraced homes in London enjoying the highest house price growth during that time.

The company, which provides Help to Buy-style equity loans, analysed the changing price per square metre of all properties sold in England and Wales since 2010, and found that the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for each property type by region, and also at an England and Wales-wide level.

Despite recent stagnation, Greater London was home to the highest performing property types in all but one category over the past decade. The capital’s flats, terraced and semi-detached houses all outperformed their counterparts in other regions, with growth of 4.93%, 5.07%, and 4.33% respectively.

But owners of detached houses in the East of England saw only a marginally higher growth: 3.07% compared to 3.06% in London.

Across all of England and Wales, the top performing property type was terraced houses, with an average growth of 3.05%. Semi-detached houses had growth of 2.9% on average, with flats seeing growth of 2.35%. The slowest growing property type was detached houses, with annual growth rates of 2.33% since 2010.

Flats in the North East performed the worst of any regional property type, with an average decrease in price of 0.5%. Flats in Yorkshire and The Humber, and the North West also lost value over the decade, with 0.12% and 0.04% decreases annually respectively.

Vadim Toader, founder and CEO of Proportunity, said: “The 2010s were marked by the after-effects of the financial crisis, and then by Brexit uncertainty.

“Despite these headwinds, we have largely seen growth across the board but the clear winner is terraced housing, or more specifically, terraced homes in London, with buyers likely attracted to their historic characteristics and charm, as well as their limited supply, compared to new builds. Yet, despite their popularity, they are out of reach for many first time buyers in the capital, with Help to Buy restricted to new-builds only, which are typically flats or semi-detached or detached houses.”

Compound Annual Growth 

Region Name flat cagr 2010-2019 terr cagr 2010-2019 semi cagr 2010-2019 detached cagr 2010-2019
East Midlands 0.74% 1.78% 2.11% 2.25%
East of England 2.62% 3.47% 3.59% 3.07%
London 4.93% 5.07% 4.33% 3.06%
North East -0.50% 0.08% 0.47% 0.67%
North West -0.04% 1.07% 1.43% 1.21%
South East 2.49% 3.40% 3.41% 2.84%
South West 1.34% 2.19% 2.35% 2.18%
Wales 0.50% 0.90% 1.01% 1.20%
West Midlands 0.65% 1.52% 1.96% 1.91%
Yorkshire and The Humber -0.12% 0.91% 1.30% 1.32%
England and Wales 2.35% 3.05%     2.90% 2.33%

Price per square metre (£)

Region Name flat ppsqm 2010 flat ppsqm 2019 terr ppsqm 2010 terr ppsqm 2019 semi ppsqm 2010 semi ppsqm 2019 detached ppsqm 2010 detached ppsqm 2019
East Midlands 1762.7 1883.2 1561.8 1830.5 1692.1 2041 1918.9 2344.7
East of England 2563.4 3234.3 2423 3294 2474.8 3398.9 2703.6 3550.2
London 4085 6301.6 4215.8 6577.2 4289 6282.5 4745.2 6222
North East 1459.5 1394.9 1283.5 1292.4 1545.6 1612 1885.4 2002.4
North West 1753.8 1747.4 1438.8 1583.4 1708.7 1941.3 2036.3 2269.4
South East 2806 3502 2717.1 3671.6 2778.8 3758.9 3081.6 3966.2
South West 2388.2 2691.4 2221.6 2700.5 2275.2 2803.9 2531.6 3073.2
Wales 1645.5 1720.7 1414.9 1534.1 1593.2 1743.5 1841 2049.8
West Midlands 1836 1946.8 1694.9 1941.9 1816.2 2162.6 2109.8 2502.1
Yorkshire and The Humber 1791.2 1772.2 1496.3 1623.3 1691.7 1899.9 1966.6 2212.7
England and Wales 2417.1 2978.6 2225.2 2915.7 2347.2 3037 2600.9 3200.3

The Guild supports clampdown on rogue landlords

The Guild supports clampdown on rogue landlords

The government’s decision to invest an additional £4m in funding for local councils to tackle criminal landlords and letting agents has been warmly welcomed by The Guild of Property Professionals.

The housing secretary, Robert Jenrick, announced on Friday that he has pledged new funding to be used to clamp down on rogue landlords, with the money set to be shared between more than 100 councils across England

He commented: “Councils already have strong powers to force landlords to make necessary improvements to a property through the use of a range of measures, including civil penalties and banning orders for the worst offenders.

“The grants will support a range of projects to enable councils to make the best use of these powers. This will include trialling innovative ideas, sharing best practice and targeted enforcement where we know landlords shirk their responsibilities.”

There are more than 4.5 million households in the private rented sector in England, with recent statistics showing that 82% of private renters are satisfied with their accommodation, which although impressive, does suggest that there is room for improvement

The Guild’s inhouse Compliance Officer, Paul Offley, said: “We fully support this initiative as it will ensure that rogue landlords and letting agents are punished for breaking the law and it will also ensure that more tenants are treated fairly.

“With the funding providing councils with a means to crack down on illegal activity in the lettings market, tenants will have more protection and the standards of the rental sector will be raised.”

“An environment where exploitative landlords are stamped out will enable good landlords and letting agents to thrive,” he added.

But the government funding to root out criminal landlords has been described by the Residential Landlords Association (RLA) as inadequate to tackle the scale of the problem.

David Smith, policy director for the RLA, said: “We welcome the government’s focus on rooting out criminal landlords. For too long the debate has been driven by ideological calls for more regulation of the sector. What is needed is better enforcement of the powers already available to tackle the minority who bring the sector into disrepute.

“The funding though is nowhere near enough. Instead of offering inadequate and sporadic pots of money, it is critical that the government provides proper, multi-year funding to enable councils to plan and prepare workable strategies to find the criminal landlords. This should be supported by councils having the political will to prioritise enforcement against the crooks rather than tying good landlords up in licensing schemes which do nothing to protect tenants.”

A fall in available rental stock would see ‘increased competition and higher rents’

A fall in available rental stock would see ‘increased competition and higher rents’

Greater confidence and more certainty in the housing market following last month’s Tory election victory looks set to boost the housing market and unleash pent-up buyer demand from property buyers, including buy-to-let investors, in the early part of 2020, analysts predict.

But Anton Frost, a partner at Carter Jonas letting agents, believes that continued political uncertainties, in particular, the deadline for Brexit rade talks at the end of the year, will keep a lid on activity levels in the housing market, including the buy-to-let sector.

He said: “2020 may begin with a new government but the familiar uncertainty over our departure from the EU will remain, and there is no doubt that this year will see the lettings market continuing to navigate through what has been a turbulent period.”

Frost, like many letting specialist, is concerned that tax and regulatory changes will dampen landlords’ appetites to invest and expand their property portfolios, with many consolidating their assets, or opting to flee the sector altogether.

Frost commented: “Policy changes and financial pressures on landlords has left many concerned that their investments are no longer viable. We’ve already seen the tenant fee ban and continuation of tax relief changes deter investors from the market in 2019, and this may well continue into 2020.

“With less stock comes increased competition and higher rents, and without legislative changes that can stabilise the landlord market, the tenant struggle for the right home at an affordable price may go unchanged.

“That said, no matter what picture the political landscape paints, people need to move and there has and always be a healthy level of activity in the rental market. Yield potential and tenant affordability are problems that remain paramount, but the market will always be transactional.

“Landlords are dubious about what 2020 holds, but clarity over if, how and when Britain leaves the EU should see an overall sense of stability return to the market, which can only be a positive thing.”

Under-resourced county courts are struggling to cope with the number of possession claims being put forward, ‘causing misery for landlords’

January will be ‘real test of consumer sentiment’ as UK prepares to leave the EU

There are tentative signs that landlords are beginning to return to the buy-to-let market, particularly in London where house price falls and steady rental growth are gradually enticing investors back, according to Knight Frank.

The company reports that during the first 11 months of 2019, landlords acquired 11% of homes sold in Great Britain, the same level as 2018. But in November alone, the proportion of homes bought by investors increased to 12%.

London recorded a bigger rise in landlord purchases. Landlords purchased 13% of homes sold in the capital during the first 11 months of 2019, up from 11% during the same period of 2018. This was the first rise since 2015 but is in part due to fewer owner-occupiers transacting in the market. But will this trend continue?

The latest UK Finance mortgage data published this week suggests that property purchase and remortgage approvals in November held up relatively well given that the country was in full general election mode.

Andrew Montlake, managing director of the UK-wide mortgage broker, Coreco, said: “For a lot of British households, November was a classic case of better the devil you know.

“They chose to get their houses in order and secure a mortgage before a potentially disruptive election result.

“In the week following the general election result we saw a slight uplift in enquiries but the buyer spirit was largely trumped by the Christmas spirit.

“January will be the real test of consumer sentiment as we approach our departure from the EU.

“There is still much uncertainty as to the intricacies of how we leave the EU, but people at least now know it’s coming and that creates confidence.”

The figures also reveal that there were 16,200 remortgages in the buy-to-let sector in October, 2.4% fewer than the same month in 2018.

Montlake added: “While we are expecting an uplift in transactions and remortgages, it would be premature to assume that 2020 will be a boom year for the property and mortgage markets.

“As negotiations with Brussels unfold there is still the potential for volatility.”

New trade body launches for BTL landlords

New trade body launches for BTL landlords A new landlord organisation, which is the largest ever trade body in the letting sector, has been officially launched.

The National Residential Landlords Association, which came into force yesterday, has a membership of more than 80,000 landlords.

The new organisation has come about after the National Landlords Association (NLA) and the Residential Landlords Association (RLA) agreed to merge in autumn, with a view to delivering a stronger voice for landlords in the private rented sector.

Ben Beadle is the NRLA’s new chief executive, having joined from Touchstone, part of the Places for People housing group. He was previously managing director of TDS Northern Ireland and director of customer service with the TDS.

The two previous chairs, Alan Ward of the RLA and Adrian Jeakings of the NLA, said in a joint statement: “After more than 20 years of friendly competition the time is right to create a single organisation to represent and campaign for landlords.

“With so much of our work done in parallel there are major benefits to be gained for our landlord members.

“We will be stronger together when presenting a unified voice to government both nationally and locally about the importance of supporting the majority of landlords who do a good job providing the homes to rent the country needs.”

Scrapping Section 21 is ‘another attack’ against BTL landlords

Scrapping Section 21 is ‘another attack’ against BTL landlords The Queen has announced the new government’s priorities for its coming term, and it includes a proposal to abolish Section 21 of the Housing Act and reforming the grounds for possession, as part of a new Renters’ Reform Bill, designed to “introduce a package of reforms to deliver a fairer and more effective rental market”.

But in the absence of any meaningful plan to boost the level of social housing in this country, the announcement confirming the abolition of Section 21 in yesterday’s Queens speech has been described by ARLA Propertymark as “another attack against the landlords who actually house the nation”.

The trade body’s chief executive, David Cox, said: “If Section 21 is scrapped, Section 8 must be reformed and a new specialist housing tribunal created. Without this, supply will almost certainly fall which will have the consequential effect of raising rents and will further discourage new landlords from investing in the sector.

“ARLA Propertymark will be engaging with the government to ensure they fully understand the consequences of any changes, and we will be scrutinising the legislation, to ensure landlords have the ability to regain their properties if needed.”

The government also plans to introduce a new scheme to permit tenants to transfer their tenancy deposits when they move properties.

The new Lifetime Deposit scheme will permit renters to transfer their deposit from one property to another instead of being left out of pocket for weeks while they wait to be reimbursed from their old landlord but have to spend money securing their new property.

However, landlords will also be given strengthened powers to regain possession of their property under the new proposed Bill, while the expansion of the database of rogue landlords is also included in the legislation to be introduced in Parliament.

But the Residential Landlords Association (RLA) has also warned of a rental crisis that could lead to a mass sell-off of properties following the announcement Section 21 will be scrapped.

The organisation is calling on the government to develop a dedicated housing court to ensure that there is easily accessible and swift justice available where there are conflicts between landlords and tenants.

David Smith, RLA policy director, commented: “We accept the need to protect tenants from abuse, but it is crucial that plans to reform the way repossessions can take place are got right if the government is to avoid a rental housing crisis.

“Unless the new system is fair to good landlords as well as tenants, those same landlords who we need to support simply will not have the confidence to provide the rented homes that are needed to meet the demand.”

House price growth set to pick up speed following an end to the political gridlock

House price growth set to pick up speed following an end to the political gridlockResidential property prices, much like the economy, are likely to grow faster than initially anticipated next year thanks to the greater political certainty unlocked by the Conservative Party’s decisive election victory last week, according to Rightmove.

The property website forecasts that average asking prices will increase by 2% in 2020, up from the existing annual rate of 0.8%, thanks to low-interest rates, high employment, rising wages, greater political clarity, and a widening supply-demand imbalance.

Rightmove’s December House Price Index notes that the number of sales agreed so far in 2019 is 3% lower than a year earlier, but the number of properties coming to market has dropped far more significantly by 8%, with estate agents’ stock levels at a two-year low.

Property price growth is expected to be led by northern areas, with Rightmove expecting to see an increase of between 2% and 4%.

In the south, which is generally more expensive, a more modest 1% growth rate is anticipated.

Miles Shipside, Rightmove director and housing market analyst, commented: “Home-mover confidence and activity have been dogged by political uncertainty since the 2016 referendum.

“With a clear majority in the election, there is now an opportunity to release some of the pent-up demand in the spring, and for some modest upwards price movement.

“Given the Brexit track record to date, further political twists and turns should not be ruled out, though with a large majority there is a higher possibility of an end to the series of Brexit deadlines, and the prospect of an orderly resolution.”

Many landlords ‘have not recognised the need to educate themselves’

Many landlords ‘have not recognised the need to educate themselves’ How do you potentially balance property buying and management with a full-time job? What strategies have you developed to build wealth and generate passive income?

When it comes to investing in property there is a lot to learn.

Generic education has become one of the most important tools for landlords, according to Paul Shamplina, a director at Hamilton Fraser Group and founder of Landlord Action.

“One of the most common excuses I hear from landlords is ‘I didn’t know’,” he said.

Whether you are new to property or a long-term investor, it is important to keep on top of tax and regulatory changes, along with a wide range of other commitments.

Shamplina continued: “We enter education from a young age and then later, may take the path of further education which best suits our skillset or interests.

“No matter what we do, we are always learning. For example, when we start a new job, more often than not, we’re given training and guidance.”

Shamplina feels that part of the problem with the PRS is that for many, becoming a landlord started off as a “lucrative hobby, not a job”.

As the sector has grown, it has become entirely necessary to put some policies in place to protect the consumer and raise standards, just as a business would have in place for its employees and customer.

However, legislation has come so thick and fast that many landlords have struggled to keep up and have not recognised the need to educate themselves as a landlord.

He added: “If you are a landlord that likes managing your rental property yourself, building a relationship with your tenant so that they are encouraged to stay longer and treat your property as a home, that is fantastic.

“However, the latest count I read, was there are now 176 rules and regulations relating to letting a property, so my advice is to simply learn, learn, learn.

“I tell all the landlords and letting agents I train to go online at the beginning of the day before they get stuck into work mode, emails and calls, and just read what is going on in our industry.

Shamplina advises BTL landlords to visit various websites dedicated to the PRS, including Landlord Today.

He also advises landlords to join a landlord association such as NLA or RLA, as, in his view, they “provide the latest news, campaigns, lobbying, market trends and sign posting of recommended suppliers, as well as an advice line”.

He continued: “Being part of this community of professional landlords means collectively we have a stronger voice. This I have seen first-hand while sitting on the Fair Possessions Coalition in response to the government’s intentions to abolish Section 21.

“Along with many other organisations and associations in the industry, we’ve come together. We need more of this going forward.

“Landlord Redress will be mandatory in the not too distant future. Personally, I think this will be a positive move which will force landlords to be accountable, responsive and more compliant when renting out a property. And yes, this will require more learning because it means the consumer, your customer, will be able to make a complaint about your service.

“It’s tough enough working full time, being a parent, running your own house, etc. So, if you simply do not have the time to be a professional landlord, find a tenant, deal with all the compliance paperwork, arrange an inventory and handle regular communication with your tenants, I strongly advise you to use a managing agent.”

Landlord regulations up a third since 2010

The number of regulations landlords must abide by has increased by 32% since 2010, new analysis has found.

The total number of regulations affecting landlords now stands at 156, up from 118 when the Conservative-led coalition government came to power, the Residential Landlords Association (RLA) said.

The RLA is warning that the increased regulation of the rental sector is not translating into action against landlord. A previous study by the organisation found that in 2017/18, despite a greater amount of regulation now governing the sector, two thirds of councils had not commenced any prosecutions against private landlords.

Ahead of the General Election in December 2019, the RLA has proposed scrapping licensing schemes, which it states serve only to penalise good landlords whilst enabling the criminals to operate under the radar.

Instead, the RLA is encouraging local councils to use the wide range of data already available, including council tax, benefits, tenancy deposit and electoral roll information to identify landlords.

David Smith, policy director for the RLA, said: “Removing criminal landlords from the sector will only be achieved if councils have the resources and the will to properly use the wide range of powers they already have.

“Piling more regulations onto the sector which will continue not to be properly enforced is meaningless and serves only to put off good landlords from providing the homes to rent we need. It is time for smarter enforcement, not more regulation.”

Property expert urges BTL landlords to ride out recession

With Britain edging closer to its first recession since the financial crisis, a leading property auctioneer is urging property investors, including buy-to-let landlords, to hold their nerve against the spectre of an economic downturn.

The country’s dominant service sector, which accounts for about 80% of the economy, unexpectedly plunged into contraction last month, in a sign of the increasing stress facing the economy as Brexit looms.

According to IHS Markit and the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply (Cips), activity in the sector fell as companies reported a fall in sales, job losses, cancelled and postponed projects and weak investment levels.

There has been a recent rise in properties going into receivership, banks unwilling to lend for construction projects and a decline in tenants looking to rent business or residential properties, according to Mark Bailey, managing director of Landwood Group, who says that a rise in auction sales is also evident, largely down to an increase in repossessions.

He said: “Worryingly, at Landwood we are also receiving more instructions over the past few months than we have done for a year or more – instructions for properties that have sadly gone into receivership.

“It is harder for property owners to let business space and for domestic landlords to find tenants  – there’s no doubt that a squeeze is on.

“With each failed building project, banks become more nervous to lend, builders stop building… and we fall headlong into a dreaded recession. Once we do, it’s anyone’s guess how deep it is or how long it lasts.

“The blame for all of this cannot be put at the door of Brexit… well, not entirely. There is no arguing with the fact that this is a period of change – domestically and globally. People err to the negative whenever there is change on the horizon – until events transpire and the scales balance out. The big issue is uncertainty and property is key to all of this. Uncertainty causes negativity, while a solid market has the opposite effect.”

So, if the pointers are all correct and a recession is upon us, what is the advice?

“Sit tight,” said Bailey. “Whether you are a commercial property owner or a domestic landlord, try your best to ride it out, perhaps for six months, before making any business decisions. Look at your borrowings and don’t over-stretch yourself at this time.

“There are always people who benefit from downturns in the market and they tend to be cash buyers. So if you have cash to invest long-term, a ripe time to buy may be about to begin.

“For the rest of us, it’s time to batten down the hatches and ride out the storm – see you on the other side.”


 

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